GEOGRAPHIES OF DISRUPTION: MAPPING TO MAKE SENSE OF 2020'S SOCIOPOLITICAL UPHEAVAL

This Year's Format

This year, our experts will explore the disenfranchisement and disruptions of 2020, and examine how mapping can help us make sense of crucial issues both during this historic year and beyond. Five guests across a range of disciplinesincluding public health, media studies, digital humanities, and library sciencewill come together for a moderated panel discussion, available NOW in the section below!

Following the release of our recorded panel, we hope you'll join us on Facebook Live the week of November 16 for a series of live keynote lectures delivered by our individual panelists! Though it's not required, we'd encourage you to view the recorded panel ahead of attending the individual lectures and come prepared to ask questions.

Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, no in-person events will be held this year. In lieu of our usual info fair in Wells Library, we hope you'll explore the resources and links laid out for you below to expand your GIS network both on and off campus.

Schedule: November 16 - 20

AVAILABLE NOW: GEOGRAPHIES OF DISRUPTION PANEL DISCUSSION
ASYNCHRONOUS / AVAILABLE BELOW


MON NOV 16: PLACING ENVIRONMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE ON NOTICE
1 - 2 PM / FACEBOOK LIVE
Dr. Erik Nelson, Indiana University


TUE NOV 17: GIS AND SPATIAL THINKING FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: POTENTIAL, PITFALLS, AND CONSIDERATIONS
1 - 2 PM / FACEBOOK LIVE
Dr. Arrianna Planey, University of North Carolina


WED NOV 18: "SENSING" PLACE: HABIT CHANGE IN THE MOBILE, CONNECTED PRESENT
1 - 2 PM / FACEBOOK LIVE
Dr. Heidi Rae Cooley, University of Texas at Dallas


THU NOV 19: RESEARCH IN SOLIDARITY: DOCUMENTING DISPOSESSION AND RESISTANCE WITH THE ANTI-EVICTION MAPPING PROJECT
3 - 4 PM / FACEBOOK LIVE
Terra Graziani, Anti-Eviction Mapping Project


FRI NOV 20: ASPECTS OF MAPPING AND GIS SERVICE IN HIGHER EDUCATION LIBRARY
1 - 2 PM / FACEBOOK LIVE
Girmaye Misgna, Penn Libraries

"Geographies of Disruption" Panel Discussion


Experts explore the disenfranchisement and disruptions of 2020, and examine how mapping can help us make sense of crucial issues both during this historic year and beyond. Our five guests discuss issues related to political ecologies of health and disease, relationships between bodies and technology, data access, and geospatial methodology as applied to humanities and social sciences.

If you have questions about any of the topics discussed in the panel, we'd love to see you at any of the individual lectures we're hosting between November 16-20. Each lecture will have a 20-30 minute Q&A session. For more details and individual speaker information, scroll on!

Speakers

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CHRISTY HYMAN, UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA LINCOLN
Moderator for "Geographies of Disruption" panel discussion
Panel Release Date: Tuesday, November 10th
Christy Hyman is a PhD student in the Program of Geography at the University of Nebraska Lincoln. Her research focuses on African American efforts toward cultural and political assertion in the Great Dismal Swamp region during the antebellum era. Hyman also examines the attendant social and environmental costs of human/landscape resource exploitation in the Great Dismal Swamp. Christyuses Critical GIS to observe to what extent digital mapping can inform us of the human experience while acknowledging phenomena deriving from oppressive systems in society threatening sustainable futures. Christy’s dissertation is tentatively titled, “Contested Space: Mobilities, Networks, and the Pursuit of Freedom in the Great Dismal Swamp.”
View Christy's Biography / Visit Christy's Website
Erik Nelson, MPH, PhD
DR ERIK NELSON, INDIANA UNIVERSITY
Placing Environmental Lead Exposure on Notice
Monday, November 16 / 1-2 PM / Facebook Live
Lead is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that causes numerous adverse health effects in children, particularly neurological and neurobehavioral deficits, lower IQ, slowed growth, and anemia. Childhood lead exposure has also been linked to impulsive behaviors, which, in turn, are associated with a host of negative health outcomes and behaviors. Those at highest risk for elevated blood lead levels are persons living in substandard housing, which are often inhabited by racial minorities and socioeconomically disadvantaged persons. This talk will discuss findings of the interplay of lead, concentrated disadvantage and public health outcomes such as sexually transmitted infections and instances of crime. In addition, we will address the power of geospatial modeling techniques to estimate lead exposure risk for communities.
Full Event Details / Dr. Nelson's Biography 
Arrianna Planey, MA, PhD
DR ARRIANNA PLANEY, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
GIS and Spatial Thinking for Public Health: Potential, Pitfalls, and Considerations
Tuesday, November 17 / 1-2 PM / Facebook Live
There is growing interest in geographic information science and spatial analysis in public health research and practice, with emphasis on place-based interventions. However, given the spatialization of social inequity, these tools and methods can be used to reproduce the status quo if we do not critically apply spatial thinking when we use spatial methods and tools for public health problems. In this talk, I impress the importance of place for public health and discuss potential remedies and directions.
Full Event Details / Dr. Planey's Biography
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DR HEIDI RAE COOLEY, UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS
“Sensing” Place: Habit Change in the Mobile, Connected Present
Wednesday, November 18 / 1-2 PM / Facebook Live
We live in an age when mobile touchscreen devices are customarily “on” and in-hand. As a consequence, we frequently engage in practices that involve documenting the self in motion, our geolocational beads (or arrows) locating us and guiding us to destinations of interest (e.g., ATMs, gas stations, restaurants, friend’s houses). These are the sorts of habits our technologies engender. And I contend that, in doing so, they help form and regulate conduct in a nonconscious, habitual—even neurophysiological—manner. In which case, it is at the nonconscious level of existence that habit change needs to work. In this talk, I will draw on American pragmatist Charles Sanders Pierce’s account of habit change to discuss how our geolocative devices might orient us differently in relation to the landscapes and urban terrains we traverse. To provide example of what habit change might look like in the mobile, connected present, I discuss three collaborative mapping projects in whose design and development I have participated. These projects—Augusta App, Ghosts of the Horseshoe, and Ward One App—have afforded me opportunities to explore how the very mechanisms through which technologies of connectivity and location awareness shape habit might also serve as vehicles for re-appropriating social, political histories and practices in the service of habit change.
Full Event Details / Dr. Cooley's Biography
Terra Graziani, Educopia Institute
TERRA GRAZIANI, ANTI-EVICTION MAPPING PROJECT
Research in Solidarity: Documenting Dispossession and Resistance with The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project
Thursday, November 19th / 3 - 4 PM / Facebook Live
What does it mean to do research in solidarity with movements? This presentation will share lessons from the work of The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, a data-visualization, data analysis, and storytelling collective documenting dispossession and resistance upon gentrifying landscapes. With chapters in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, and New York City, AEMP is a collective of scholars, storytellers, organizers, activists, and artists using data to fight for tenants’ rights and housing justice. Working with community partners and in solidarity with numerous housing movements, we study and visualize new entanglements of global capital, real estate, technocapitalism, and political economy. Our narrative oral history and video work centers the displacement of people and complex social worlds, but also modes of resistance. Maintaining antiracist and feminist analyses as well as decolonial methodology, the project creates tools and disseminates data contributing to collective resistance and movement building.
Full Event Details / Terra's Biography
Girmaye Misgna, Penn Libraries
GIRMAYNE MISGNA, PENN LIBRARIES
Aspects of Mapping and GIS service in higher education library
Friday, November 20 / 1 - 2 PM / Facebook Live
Based on experience at the Penn Libraries, my talk will explore the landscape of Mapping and GIS services at higher education institutions, and the role and core competency of the GIS librarian in promoting spatial literacy on campus through presentation of several examples:

1) The Penn MapRoom/MapTable as a collaborative mapping method that have been successfully integrated as a course curriculum into an Urban History class;
2) Penn COVID-19 Twitter sentiment mapping;
3) crowdsourced accessbility mapping application;
4) deep mapping in an ancient history project; and
5) miscellaneous research project consultations. 

The examples cover applications in various disciplines from the Social sciences, humanities, and health sciences, to physical sciences.

Network

Connect with the Bloomington GIS Community! Expand the sections to learn more about groups engaging with GIS on our campus and in our community.

The GIS group is part of our local government's Information and Technology Services Departments. We manage spatial data and provides mapping and spatial analysis services to support operations of City Departments, Boards and Commissions, and the general public.

Website: bloomington.in.gov/gis
Contact: Laura Haley (haleyl@bloomington.in.gov)

A technology leader and one of the largest providers of e-government geospatial solutions in the US, Schneider Geospatial provides innovative, industry-leading solutions combining GIS and related technologies to help organizations get the most from their limited resources. Schneider Geospatial offers a full range of GIS, technology, and e-government services and products. Whether we are designing a new system for a client, converting paper or digital records into GIS, implementing new technology, providing staff training, or serving as/complimenting an organization’s GIS staff, Schneider Geospatial’s service level raises the bar for what our clients expect. Product examples include creative and award-winning product solutions such as Beacon™ (local government information for the web), GeoPermits™ (cloud-based permitting and workflow management), and Agland™ (automates the calculating process for agricultural assessments) to name a few.

Website: schneiderGIS.com
Contact: Maggie Carter (mcarter@schneiderGIS.com)

GIS Services for the IUB Libraries are based out of the Herman B Wells Library, Government Information, Maps, & Microforms Services (GIMMS). The GIS Librarian offers one-on-one assistance with finding and managing data, GIS applications, and classroom instruction. The library also offers GIS Workshops in the Scholars' Commons on a variety of topics. GIMMS is also home to the Herman B Wells Library map collection, which holds over half a million sheet maps. Collection strengths are the state of Indiana, Russia & Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and the African Continent, though the collection contains maps of nearly every country in the world.

Website: libraries.indiana.edu/maps-and-gis
Contact: Theresa Quill (gimms@indiana.edu)

We cover the five main disciplines of public health, including epidemiology, environmental health and social and behavioral health. As we know from the current pandemic, mapping is critical to understand the spread of disease and the location of places and situations that promote or detract from health for the population.

Website: publichealth.indiana.edu
Contact: Bernadette de Leon (deleon@iu.edu)
Additional Resources: deleon.pages.iu.edu/spatial_resources_page.pdf

Sponsors

GIS Day 2020 is organized by Drew Heiderscheidt, Theresa Quill, and Heather Sloan, with financial support from the following departments:

Department of Information & Library Science

Contact: Ron Day
Website: ils.indiana.edu

The Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities (IDAH)

Contact: Kalani Craig & Michelle Dalmau
Website: idah.indiana.edu

IU Libraries

Contact: Elinor Okada
Website: libraries.indiana.edu

IU Media School

Website: mediaschool.indiana.edu

IU School of Public Health

Contact: Bernadette De Leon
Website: publichealth.indiana.edu

IU Cultural Studies Program

Contact: Raiford Guins
Website: cstudies.indiana.edu